Cut to 02: EDITOR, ACTRESS, SCREENWRITER, DIRECTOR

Cut to:
Editor, Actress, Screenwriter, Director

Viola Lawrence (editor), Rosalind Russell (actress), Mary C. McCall Jr. (screenwriter) and Dorothy Arzner (director) during the 1936 production of Craig’s Wife.

“My philosophy is that to be a director you cannot be subject to anyone, even the head of the studio. I threatened to quit each time I didn’t get my way, but no one ever let me walk out.”
— “Silent Women: Pioneers of Cinema” edited by Melody Bridges and Cheryl Robson. The full text can be found in the Appendix.

Anne Bauchens was the editor of the 1928 version of Craig’s Wife by William C. DeMille (Cecil B.’s older brother).

Cut to 01: THE POWER OF THE CLOSE-UP

Cut to:
The Power of the Close-up

Viola Lawrence understood the power of close-ups and that highlighting an actor’s eyes would add to the drama and emotion of a shot. When assigned to edit The Lady from Shanghai, she reported to studio boss Harry Cohn that “the footage was a jumbled mess” and that Welles “had not shot a single close-up.” Welles reluctantly obeyed orders to add some.